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Good Fat vs. Bad Fat

Good Fat vs. Bad Fat
23 Oct
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buy provigil mexico Are you eating the right kinds of fat? Or do you shy away from fatty foods all together? Lately, fat has gotten a pretty bad rap. There is an increasing movement to get away from fat and carbs, and increase the intake of protein. But they have it wrong, because the body needs fat to function properly.

What is fat?

Going Here There are four types of fat – Saturated Fat, Monounsaturated Fat, Polyunsaturated Fat, and Trans Fat.

An often overlooked fact, is that fat makes us feel full. Fat is the macro-nutrient that is most dense in calories at 9 calories per gram (compared to 4 calories per gram for both fat and carbs). Because of this, foods that are high in fat can help us feel full. Most fat free products like cookies and chips lack fat, which can lead us to eat more to feel satisfied. Also, fat free foods usually contain more sugar, so in the end we eat the same amount of calories (if not more).

It’s critical to be informed and know the right kinds of fats to eat. Since there are different types of fats, we end up labeling them as “Good” and “Bad” fats. On one side we have Saturated fats, which are considered to be “Bad”, on another side we have “Good” or Unsaturated (Mono and Poly) fats, and finally we have the real evil – Trans Fat.

Saturated Fat – The Bad Guy

Saturated fat, is solid at room temperature, is found in meats, dairy, and some plant sources like coconut oil. The reason for its labeling comes from a study done in the 1950s by pathologist named Ancel Keys. Because of studies he conducted he believed that there was a link between saturated fats and an increase in cholesterol (and thus heart disease). The problem was that his researched was aimed to prove what he already thought. His bias caused him to selectively choose what he looked at. Although his research lead to poor dietary guidelines, it also helped create statin drugs that are used for controlling high cholesterol. Since his research, saturated fat has been labeled the bad guy. But new information now suggests the opposite is true, and also shows the importance of saturated fats in our diet.

Unsaturated Fats – The Good Guys

Mono and Polyunsaturated fats are liquid at room temperature. Sources of unsaturated fats include olive oil, salmon, and natural peanut butter. Under this umbrella falls the ever popular Omega-3 Fatty acids, and for good reason, there are numerous health benefits such as helping to control cholesterol, decreasing inflammation, and reducing heart disease. One of the top nutrition experts in the world and owner of Precision, Dr. John Berardi, recommends 3-9 grams of Fish Oil daily to kick start any diet.

Trans Fat – Just AVOID

The Trans fats that you should avoid are made artificially to extend shelf life of products and improve taste. If you see Trans Fat in the nutrition label or ‘Partially Hydrogenated Oils’ in the ingredient list –AVOID. Tran’s fats can increase your cholesterol levels, specifically LDL which increases your risk for heart disease and stroke. Luckily, they really only appear in processed foods. As long as you focus your attention on whole foods you will miss most of these.

All fats aside, fat is a necessary part of your diet (Except for Tran’s fat). Besides being a great source of energy, fats help with the absorption and storage of fat soluble vitamins A, D, E, and K, which are essential for brain and nerve functions. Fats also play a role in the formation of steroid hormones to regulate the body. As with everything, the key is to not overdo it. Generally, you want to try to eat more unsaturated fats than saturated fats, and definitely try to get your fats from whole foods. Do not listen to fad diets that call for no fats, it is essential and a healthy balance that helps you jump start your weight loss.

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